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What Is A Limited Partnership?

What Is A Limited Partnership?

A limited partnership is just another type of partnership. It is different from a general partnership because it has both general partners and limited partners. A limited partnership is also considered a distinct entity from its partners.

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So What’s Going to Happen to New Overtime Rules Come December 1?

If you are like many of my clients, this is a very important question for you.  We have been planning for how to address the new DOL rules on the increased salary threshold for classifying an employee as exempt to become effective on December 1, 2016.  

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Get Ready for EEOC Activity on Sexual Orientation and Transgender Sexual Discrimination Charges

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC) has begun pursuing in earnest charges and lawsuits based on “sex discrimination” under Title VII for sexual orientation and transgender discrimination.
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HR Managers Can Help Stem the Tide of Huge Damages

According to a January report from the large national employment law firm, Seyfarth-Shaw*, the value of class-based employment-related litigation and enforcement actions reached an all-time high in 2015.
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Independent Contractor Classification Review: Avoid DOL/IRS/TWC Trouble

The fight continues between employers and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL),  the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and state employment agencies over who can truly be classified as “independent contractors”. Misclassification can be tragic for employers. Don't let your business be one of the targets.

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New Overtime Rules' Implementation Substantially Delayed

Earlier this year, I predicted we would have to deal with the new Department Of Labor (DOL) regulations defining who can be classified as exempt on January 1, 2016.
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Texas Employers—How Will You Deal with New Texas Open Carry Law?

Big Decisions Have To Be Made


Do you allow guns in the workplace, or do you not?  
Employers and HR professionals are caught in the debate and legal consequences between maintaining a safe workplace and allowing employees to possess firearms in the workplace. 

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Good News for Third-Party Employers of Home Care Workers, for Seniors, and the Disabled

Many home health care agencies were getting ready for a drastic change in their pay practices as a result of a new Department of Labor (DOL) regulation that was to take effect on January 1, 2015.  The new regulation would have kept third-party employers, who constitute more than 90% of the home care industry, from claiming companionship and live-in exemptions from minimum wage and overtime pay rules.  They got a big Christmas present!  

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Recent Ruling  U. S. Supreme Court Says Time Spent In Security Checks Is Not Compensable

The U. S. Supreme Court just issued a unanimous decision in Integrity Staffing Solutions Inc v Busk, et al, (Dec. 9, 2014), which was widely called “the security check case”.  Warehouse workers had sued Integrity Staffing for uncompensated time they were required to spend in security screenings lasting up to 25 minutes at the end of their shifts while assigned to work in Amazon warehouses. The Supreme Court ruled employees do not have to be paid for time spent waiting for and actually undergoing security checks. 

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EEOC Challenges Severence Agreements

Employers frequently will use a “Severance Agreement and Release” when terminating an employee as a means to head off possible post-termination legal claims. Such agreements always have been subject to stringent requirements to be valid and enforceable. In a number of different cases recently, the EEOC has challenged what have been standard release of claims provisions and other terms in such agreements, saying they violate the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) and Title VII.

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